How to Make Keto Coffee

Because coffee is a carbohydrate-free drink, it is — thankfully — one of the few daily-indulgence foods a person does not need to sacrifice on a keto diet. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t adjustments to be made to the routine—ones that make coffee a bit more keto-friendly, but no less enjoyable. 


In fact, you’ll probably come to appreciate its uniquely creamy taste and texture.


What is Keto Coffee?

Keto coffee is coffee with fat added to it. The difference in keto coffee recipes, then, is how you accomplish that. 


At a glance, the solution might seem simple: add milk. Because milk is loaded with carbohydrates and sugars, however, a standard cow’s milk is out of the question. The natural go-to, then, are butters and medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs), which help with weight loss by suppressing hunger and boosting the rate your body burns calories. These are usually packaged in oil form. (Some may also swap the butter for “ghee,” a clarified butter stripped of its water content and often used in Asian cooking.)


The added benefit, of course, is that this appetite suppression comes with a boost of energy, perfect for a morning workout. It’s also a tool for making it through intermittent fasting without caving to cravings.


Keto Coffee Recipes

Keto coffee, also known as “butter coffee,” can come in several forms -- most of which are creamy and delicious—beyond being satisfying to the stomach, to boot. Here’s how to make keto coffee.


  • Butter Coffee. Here’s how to make keto coffee in its most basic form: Grab a blender, your grass-fed butter of choice, and MCT oil. Brew your coffee through your preferred method and then add a tablespoon of the butter and MCT oil in the blender. Pulse for a few seconds until it’s frothy, then pour. If you’re looking to make it a full meal, add a collagen protein powder.
  • Light Butter Coffee. This version of the keto coffee recipe reduces the amount of butter and MCT oil. Add about half a tablespoon of each to the blender and then pour in unsweetened almond milk to taste—enough that it will look like a latte and be even frothier. (Side note: a milk frother is also a great way to accomplish this look and mouthfeel.)
  • Keto Iced Coffee. This keto coffee recipe calls for you to, first, prepare the coffee — about two cups, or 16 ounces. Then, add a tablespoon of MCT oil, and two tablespoons of heavy cream to a blender. Blend on high and then add a teaspoon of vanilla extract, half a teaspoon of cinnamon, and any added artificial sweeteners or erythritol that might be desired. Pour mixture over ice. This is just one keto iced coffee recipe, but it’s very easy to play around with variations using other spices.
  • Keto Cold Brew. This keto cold brew coffee recipe might surprise you as one of the easiest ways to make and enjoy butter coffee. How to make keto cold brew coffee: Prepare your cold brew coffee as you normally would (for beginners, use a French press), steeping coarsely ground coffee in cold water for 12 to 24 hours in a mason jar or any other device purchasable for the expressed purpose of cold brewing. After straining, cut the cold brew concentrate with water—a 1:1 ratio—and then add an unsweetened almond milk to taste. If you’re adding the clarified butter, or ghee, you’ll want to melt it and pour into the coffee, not over the ice. (So, add this before adding the ice.) Adding other fats will require heating the cold brew on low in a saucepan, adding the ingredient, and then introducing ice at the end. Gratefully, this all becomes very simple and streamlined once the cold brew coffee is made in a batch—storable for one week—and ready to grab from the fridge. And the naturally rich and non-bitter elements of the cold brew blend perfectly with most butters and oils.


If you’re currently adhering to a keto diet or looking to make the jump, never fear: you can still have your coffee. Better yet, you can boost it’s flavor and fat-burning profile with a few simple, keto-friendly tweaks. Happy coffee drinking!